Beta
No Results

Best of the Month: July 2021

Check out the trio of films the Short of the Week programming team has selected as our 'Best of the Month' for July 2021

If I'm totally honest, I think I look forward to these Best of the Month picks more than anyone else. For me, I'm always fascinated by the films our team selects as their "favourites" from our monthly coverage. At times we're in total agreement, but more often than not, the shorts selected are a prime example of the disparity in tastes in our programming team - this month's picks are a little of both

*** 

Team Favourites

From the 19 films showcased on our site in July 2021 - which included a documentary on unofficial conspiracy theory artist for the masses David Dees, an experimental fairytale dedicated to the modern Black boy and 2021 Palme d'or winner Julia Ducournau's debut short - our team has opted for a recent festival favourite, a standout animation from a "full-fledged animation auteur" and a thought-provoking satire from a music-video legend.

***

Bruiser by Miles Warren

An uncompromising examination of toxic masculinity, Warren's Sundance/SXSW short does an excellent job of positioning its audience in its young protagonist's headspace, leaving you feeling dazed and frustrated in its powerful conclusion. - Rob Munday

[READ THE FULL REVIEW]

*** 

Jim by Chris Black

Gets the balance just right between being funny but still landing the serious reality behind the comedy. - Paul Hunter

[READ THE FULL REVIEW]

*** 

Reneepoptosis by Renee Zhan

We first discovered Renee Zhan via her undergrad project Pidge. While smart and entertaining, its Creature Comforts style dark comedy didn't provide many hints at the artistic potential that lurked underneath. With 2018 short Reneepoptosis, Zhan breaks out as a full-fledged animation auteur, in this wild, solipsistic examination of the self. - Jason Sondhi

[READ THE FULL REVIEW]

*** 

Most Viewed

Believe in Ghosts by Courtney Dixon

With all our experience helping filmmakers launch their shorts online, we've come to learn a little about which films tend to be the big performers. Festival favourites, midnight shockers, sex comedies - these tend to be some of the big hitters, but portrait docs just don't seem to have the same appeal, no matter how good they are. Dixon's 16-minute profile of Black farmer Samantha Winship proved the exception. Our most-watched short from our July picks, this earnest and engaging doc won viewers with its striking aesthetic and powerful message.

[READ THE FULL REVIEW]

*** 

WATCH PAST BEST OF THE MONTH SELECTIONS